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Alex Gomory Phone: 909-784-2476
Alex Gomory is a seasoned writer who holds a degree in History from the California State Polytechnic University of Pomona where he studied early Christianity and did major research on some of the non-canonical gospels.

After graduating, he assumed a position as a writer and editor for a major real estate journal that supplies housing information to roughly one-third of the real estate agents in California. His work has been picked up by local newspapers, personal websites, and the real estate listing service, Trulia.com.

When it comes to the ambiguous world of financing and loans, Alex enjoys applying his diverse experience and wide-range of interests to the production of content that others will find both useful and interesting.
Latest Articles from Alex Gomory Google Plus Email: alex@loans.org
Man waiving money
In an effort to jumpstart the mortgage refinance market, many lenders have started to waive closing costs on refinances in exchange for offering slightly higher interest rates. Those waived fees in conjunction with record-breaking low interest rates have given way to a new trend called “serial refinancing.” According to MarketWatch, between 2006 and 2008—which was the heart of the collapse—around 3.5 million homeowners refinanced at least twice. But those refinances often resulted in more...
Man with magnifying glass looking at money
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) made a series of recent announcements hinting that the private student loan market may start to see more government oversight. According to Bloomberg, the CFPB has likened private student loans to the “subprime” loan of the college financing world. But not all private student loan borrowers are subprime, nor do they need to be treated as such. “Certain low-risk borrowers probably don’t need to be paying such high rates and paying those high rates...
Money wrapped with ribbon and bow
Washington D.C. has lent a total of $1.2 million in interest-free small business loans to local owners since the start of the year, reported the Washington Examiner. The 14 business loans lent were a product of the city’s Department of Small and Local Business Development program that began last November. All of the business loans—ranging from $40,000 to more than $150,000—were given to commercial institutions that were negatively affected by the city’s ongoing construction. The construction,...
Sad man sitting on the ground
Former clients of an Indiana-based debt consolidation company are contemplating filing for bankruptcy after they allege the personal consolidation loan company stole their money. The company in question is called Debt Doctors. Debt Doctors promised to consolidate clients’ debt, but asked for an upfront fee for their service. After receiving money from debt-laden customers, Debt Doctor’s owner passed away and the consolidation company closed their doors. Debt consolidation companies usually...
Turning a blind eye
Earlier this month, the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Department of Justice (DOJ)—headed by Eric Holder—announced that it will not pursue charges against Goldman Sacs’ executives for lying under oath about their part in the mortgage loan fraud that contributed to the recent housing crisis. Goldman Sachs was accused of betting against their own clients’ purchases by investing in markets directly opposite of the products Goldman was selling. In other words, if the home loan...
Sniper scope on money
California financial regulators announced several warnings this week regarding the proliferation of illegal online payday loan lenders offering their services to state citizens. The consumer alert, which appeared on the California Department of Corporations' (CDC’s) website, said that many of these lenders who offer bad or no credit payday loans fail to include the annual percentage rate (APR) of the financing they offer. APR is used as a standard measure of a loan’s true cost, and an APR...

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